Use this simple trick instead of using and remembering passwords

Passwords are the necessary evil of today’s world. You require a complex, unique password for your everyday online activities like mail, social media etc. If your password is short or simple, you always run the risk of hacking. If it is too long and complex, you won’t remember it.
Using password management services is no help either. We have read how password management services got hacked putting all those password holders to risk. So how do we deal with this password  problem?
Forrest Almasi of Business World has come up with a unique idea. Here is his idea in his own words,I stumbled on a way to have my cake and eat it too on LinkedIn. I rarely use LinkedIn, and as a result, can never remember my LinkedIn password. Because I can never remember my password, every time I use LinkedIn, I use the “Forgot Password” link and make a new password.
LinkedIn password reset

From here I open my email, which has a link.
LinkedIn reset email screenshot
Which takes me to a password reset page, into which I enter yet another password I won’t remember 6 months from now when I check LinkedIn next.
linkedin strong password

After doing this 3 or 4 times I realized I could keep doing this forever, and just not bother to try to remember my LinkedIn password ever again.
Most sites have a similar reset function so by extension, I can do this on every other site and never remember any password except my email’s. If I don’t have to remember passwords, and they’re only used once, I can make them insanely long and random. LinkedIn allows up to 400 characters in their passwords. Twitter and Facebook don’t appear to have limits. Here you have it – secure passwords with no memorization.”

Of course, Almasi’s idea won’t work with websites which ask for passwords every single time, like your banks. But the idea is a super one for Gmail, LinkedIn, Twitter, Yahoo and other services. You can put a really looooong unhackable password using Almasi’s idea because you don’t have to remember it. And if you can remember it, chances are that a hacker will never be able to crack it.

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